Asset Limits In Your State

Many families benefit from more than one federal support. Those families are subject to the resource and vehicle limits in each program to which they apply. As a result, the most restrictive asset limit becomes the default for all programs, or the “effective asset limit” for those families. Therefore, asset elimination in just one program may not benefit them. Rollover each state to learn about its asset limits in SNAP, TANF and LIHEAP, along with other data about its safety net programs. Click on a state to view a downloadable state profile with key facts and opportunities for reform. States are color coded along a spectrum that corresponds to their effective asset limits. The white states have eliminated their asset tests, while the darkest blue states have the lowest effective asset limits.

Rollover State

SNAP Asset Limit:  
SNAP Vehicle Limit:  
SNAP Participation Rate (2010):  
SNAP Participation Rank:  
Number of SNAP Recipients (FY 2011)  
SNAP Asset Test as % of Asset Poverty Limit:  
SNAP Participation Rate for Working Poor (2010):  
TANF Asset Limit:  
TANF Vehicle Limit:  
Number of TANF Recipients (FY 2011)  
TANF Asset Test as % of Asset Poverty Limit:  
LIHEAP Asset Limit:  
Effective Asset Limit:  

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Glossary

  • Asset Test as % of Asset Poverty Level: This number represents how an asset limit for a household in this state compares to the asset poverty level, which is the amount in savings a family would need to have to live for three months at the poverty line in the absence of income. In 2012, the asset poverty level for a family of three was $4773. For example, in a state where the TANF asset test is only $1000, families are allowed to have less than 25% of the necessary savings they would need to get by for three months.
  • SNAP Asset Limit: The amount of cash, savings and other resources a household can maintain and remain eligible for SNAP benefits.
  • SNAP Participation Rank: How each state compares to the rest of the country regarding the percentage of total eligible households that are participating in its SNAP program. The national participation rate for 2010 was 75%.
  • SNAP Participation Rate: The percentage of a state’s eligible households that are participating in SNAP.
  • SNAP Participation Rate, Working Poor: The percentage of a state’s eligible households that include at least one member earning income from a job that are participating in SNAP .
  • TANF Asset Limit: The amount of cash, savings and other resources a household can maintain and remain eligible for TANF.
  • TANF/SNAP Vehicle Limit: The treatment of an applicant's vehicles in assessing eligibility. Some states exclude all vehicles from their asset limits, while others exclude only a small portion of a vehicle's equity value.
  • LIHEAP Asset Limit: The amount of cash, savings and other resources a household can maintain and remain eligible for LIHEAP. [Please note: Michigan's LIHEAP limit is artificially high because the state includes the value of the home when assessing eligibility for emergency benefits].
  • Effective Asset Limit: The lowest asset limit that a family in a given state would be subject to if they were eligible for all three programs.